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Common Roofing Problems in Salt Lake City, UT

Salt Lake City roofing

Salt Lake City is Utah’s icy town. If the snowstorms don’t affect you, the ice dams will. The area’s winters are relatively mild compared to some surrounding areas, but the city still experiences 60 inches of snowfall every year. Ice dams are the real roofing nemesis of this story, though.

When winter temperatures drop below 32 degrees, valleys and eaves become overloaded, causing cracks that direct water straight into your home. If your roof isn’t sloped, you can expect pooling, gutter clogs, and hailstone damage. Winter isn’t the only roofing nightmare Utah locals must face. Infestations, monsoon conditions, and heat are just as destructive.

Insects and Rodents

Salt Lake City is even more prone to infestations than it is to ice. Ants, raccoons, and other rodents often hunt for comfort in local roofs and attics, so your home might become your neighborhood’s most popular nesting area. Insects and mammals chew through wood, contaminate attics, and destroy insulation. Flat roofs are particularly prone to this problem, so the perfect Salt Lake eaves are sloped.

Lateral builds attract standing water—a valuable resource for fauna. They’re also more inviting terrain for nests and offer plenty of entry points that can worsen the problem. Cracks and deteriorating organic materials are attractive to insects, so clay, concrete, and steel are better options for fighting infestations.

Moisture Resistance

The Great Salt Lake’s precipitative effects make Utah a rainy region. Monsoon moisture is often paired with temperatures of over 100 degrees. This weather system is harsh on architecture and HVAC power alike, so you need a strong roofing strategy. Metal roofing performs well in extreme temperatures.

Slate is impervious to heat and sunshine, so if you’re looking for that classic shingled look, you’ve met your match. Clay is particularly useful for surviving Salt Lake City’s showers and humidity, but if you’re looking for a more suitable option for your budget, concrete offers similar traits at a lower price.

Moisture requires more than just an outer layer, though. To resist rot and mold, you need ventilation and water resistance. As long as your underlayment is exposed to air, condensate will evaporate before it has time to cause damage.

While complete water resistance is another option, air-permeable membranes are generally preferred. They have a lightweight structure that resists humidity more effectively than bituminous products. If your roofing guides water away from your underlayment, mold and mildew should be kept at bay.

Winter Wind

Salt Lake City is relatively immune to extreme weather, but winter storms often come with heavy winds that can dislodge your shingles. Slate and concrete can withstand gales of 125 miles an hour, so they resist storms as well as they do insect infestations.

If your roof is intelligently pitched, you shouldn’t need more resistance than that, but if you’re determined to build a roof that could withstand an apocalypse, slate has a life expectancy of 150 years. Concrete follows closely behind, racking up a lifespan of a century.

Extreme Heat

Heatwaves are probably the hardest weather systems to tolerate in Salt Lake City. Dark roofs attract heat, forcing your air conditioner to work overtime to maintain a comfortable indoor climate. Light-coloured roofs reflect heat away from your house, with weathered white chopping an impressive 20% off your cooling bills.

Your roof protects your entire house, from your attic all the way down to your foundation. It can achieve R-values of up to 49, reducing your repair and heating bills along the way. A well-chosen product enhances your way of life, so make sure your decision counts.

More information on 1-800-HANSONS roofing in Salt Lake City including location and contact information.

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